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titleWork in progress!

Apache Struts 2 is

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titleEarly Adopters Start here

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an elegant, extensible framework for building enterprise-ready Java web applications. Distributions of Struts 2 are available as a free download under the Apache License.

The contents of the Struts 2 documentation wiki (what you're reading now) are distributed with each release, but maintained via the on-line wiki.

Tip

Have a suggestion, correction, or improvement? Log in and leave a comment on the appropriate page or file a ticket against the Struts 2 documentation. We're always looking for help!

Note

We've started planning the next version of Struts aka Struts 3 (or 2.5) which will break backward compatibility, if you want to join please add your two cents here.

Getting Started

The documentation is grouped into three four areas.

Tutorials

Our tutorials are designed to help you get started with the framework soon as possibleASAP. We offer an all-purpose "soup to nutsBootstrap" tutorial as well as specialty tutorials on portlets and database access. It contains also article and references related to Struts2

FAQs

Our FAQs provide a wide range of rapid-fire "HOWTOs" in question and answer format.

Guides

Our in-depth technical guides focus on specific components of the framework, such as Views, the Core framework, and Third-party Extensions.

An overview of all three areas is available.

Apache Struts 2 in a Nutshell

Apache Struts 2 is a flexible control layer based on standard technologies like Java Filters, JavaBeans, ResourceBundles, Locales, and XML, as well as various OpenSymphony packages, like OGNL and XWork. The framework helps you create an extensible development environment for your application, based on industry standards and proven design patterns.

The framework provides its own web Controller component and integrates with other technologies to provide the Model and the View. For the Model, the framework can interact with standard data access technologies, like JDBC and EJB, as well as most any third-party packages, like Cayenne, Hibernate, or iBATIS. For the View, the framework works well with JavaServer Pages, including JSTL and JSF, as well as FreeMarker or Velocity Templates, PDF, XSLT, and other presentation systems.

The framework's Controller acts as a bridge between the application's Model and the web View. When a request is received, the Controller invokes an Action class. The Action class consults with the Model (or, preferably, a Facade representing your Model) to examine or update the application's state. To transfer data between the Model and the View, properties can be placed on the Action class, or on a plain old JavaBean.

Most often, the Model is represented as a graph of JavaBean objects. Preferably, the Model will do the "heavy lifting", and the Action will act as a "traffic cop" or adapter. The framework provides sophisticated, automatic type conversion to simplify transfering data between rich domain objects and text-only HTTP requests.

To make it easier to access dynamic data obtained by an Action, the framework includes a library of custom tags. The tags interact with the framework's validation and internationalization features, to ensure that input is correct and output is localized. The tag library can be used with JSP, FreeMarker, or Velocity.

Struts Configuration in a Nutshell

A web application uses a deployment descriptor to initialize resources like servlets and taglibs. The deployment descriptor is formatted as a XML document and named web.xml. Likewise, the framework uses a configuration file, named struts.xml, to initialize its own resources. These resources include action mappings, to direct input to server-side Action classes, and result types, to select output pages.

Here's a simple configuration (struts.xml) for a login workflow:

Code Block

<struts>
    <include file="struts-default.xml"/>

    <package name="default" namespace="/" extends="struts-default">

        <action name="Logon" class="mailreader2.Logon">
            <result name="input">/pages/Logon.jsp</result>
            <result name="cancel" type="redirect-action">Welcome</result>
            <result type="redirect-action">MainMenu</result>
            <result name="expired" type="chain">ChangePassword</result>
        </action>

        <action name="Logoff" class="mailreader2.Logoff">
            <result type="redirect-action">Welcome</result>
        </action>

    </package>
</struts>

Aside from actions and results, you can also specify exception handlers and interceptors. Interceptors specify the "request-processing lifecycle" for an action. (What happens to the request before and after the Action class fires.) You can specify both global and local lifecycles. If some of your actions respond to AJAX, SOAP, or JSF requests, you can simplify the lifecycle, and even just "pass through" the request, if you like.

Struts 2 is extensible. Very extensible. Every class deployed by the framework is based on an interface. We provide base classes, but you can substitute your own. In the case of Action classes, even the interface is optional. POJO web development is here!

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Struts Tags, and optional Extensions, as well as migrating from Struts 1 or WebWork 2.

FAQs and Cookbook

Our FAQs and Cookbook examples provide a wide range of rapid-fire "HOWTOs" in question-and-answer format.

Security Bulletins

Our security bulletins explain any security issues and their solutions

(star) Other Resources

Books, articles, and presentations about Struts 2.

Excerpt Include
Nutshell
Nutshell
nopaneltrue

Community Wiki

The Struts 2 Community Wiki is an additional resource. It is not distributed with Struts 2, and contributions to the community wiki do not require a CLA.

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Next: Tutorials